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Frequently Asked Questions

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Scientific

The pH sensor will be shipped dry but was pre-conditioned in seawater (generally from Pacific Ocean waters near Hawaii). While conditioning and evaluating the pH sensor, only expose it filtered, sterilized natural seawater. Do not use seawater CRMs (Certified Reference Material), synthetic seawater, deionized water, NaCl Solutions, or tap water.

Before pre-deployment testing, you will need to fill the plumbing around the pH sensor with natural seawater. The pH sensor needs time to acclimate to the ionic concentration of region specific waters. Once wet, the time to recondition the sensor so that it will report within its accuracy specification depends on several factors, including the ionic composition of the seawater used and the amount of time the pH sensor was stored dry. This time can range from several hours to up to three days.

When the seawater bridge between Counter Electrode and ISFET is broken for longer than 10 seconds, it will be necessary to re-condition the sensor. The sensor does not require recalibration after being re-conditioned.

To prepare the sensor for deployment, it is recommended that several days prior to deployment, the isolated battery is connected via the float interface and the pH sensor is stored in water that is similar to the deployment site. The sensor should be stored dry to avoid bio-fouling of the ISFET and the battery may be removed during storage. Seawater creates a half cell bridge between the Counter Electrode and ISFET, and power to that circuit is provided by the isolated 9V cell. Without seawater, the battery is unnecessary and may be disconnected.

The SeaFET and SeapHOx systems are designed to sample at a fixed depth. If you want to run discreet samples at depth intervals, you will need to find a way to move the system to a specific depth before each sample interval and stop the descent / ascent for the entire pumping and sampling cycle to get a valid CTD / pH / Oxygen sample.

If you are able to communicate with the system through the serial I/O during profiling, you can send a sampling command to the sensor at each depth point and allow it to complete its sample cycle. Consult the manual for each model for the length of time required to complete each sample. Once the sensor provides a sample, you can then move it to the next depth point and repeat.

If you aren’t running real-time communications to the SeaFET/SeapHOx, you could also set it to autonomously sample at a time interval that gives you enough time to move the package to a new depth point between sample cycles. The challenges with this approach would be to know exactly when the sensor is sampling without any direct feedback from the instrument.

Manufacturing

The pH sensor will be shipped dry but was pre-conditioned in seawater (generally from Pacific Ocean waters near Hawaii). While conditioning and evaluating the pH sensor, only expose it filtered, sterilized natural seawater. Do not use seawater CRMs (Certified Reference Material), synthetic seawater, deionized water, NaCl Solutions, or tap water.

Before pre-deployment testing, you will need to fill the plumbing around the pH sensor with natural seawater. The pH sensor needs time to acclimate to the ionic concentration of region specific waters. Once wet, the time to recondition the sensor so that it will report within its accuracy specification depends on several factors, including the ionic composition of the seawater used and the amount of time the pH sensor was stored dry. This time can range from several hours to up to three days.

When the seawater bridge between Counter Electrode and ISFET is broken for longer than 10 seconds, it will be necessary to re-condition the sensor. The sensor does not require recalibration after being re-conditioned.

To prepare the sensor for deployment, it is recommended that several days prior to deployment, the isolated battery is connected via the float interface and the pH sensor is stored in water that is similar to the deployment site. The sensor should be stored dry to avoid bio-fouling of the ISFET and the battery may be removed during storage. Seawater creates a half cell bridge between the Counter Electrode and ISFET, and power to that circuit is provided by the isolated 9V cell. Without seawater, the battery is unnecessary and may be disconnected.

The nominal control voltage for the relay is 12 VDC.  However, between 5 – 30 VDC will work, applied to pin 4 relative to the ground pin 2 on the Deep SUNA V2. The voltage can be applied to the relay any time after external power is applied to the instrument for a recommended 100 milliseconds. Unless the relay is already switched on, there should be a very quiet (but audible) click when the relay connects power to the SUNA V2 electronics, and the instrument should enter its boot up cycle.

The purpose of the relay is to keep external power applied to the SUNA with very low quiescent current draw, so the typical use case involves the SUNA constantly powered. If the application includes the ability to switch power to the SUNA effectively then the relay feature isn’t necessary. Regardless of how power cycling to the SUNA is controlled, there should be a power-off period of at least 30 seconds between power-on cycles to ensure that the capacitors that prevent a hard shutdown are allowed to completely discharge and allow the SUNA to boot up properly during the next power-on cycle.

Ordering

The pH sensor will be shipped dry but was pre-conditioned in seawater (generally from Pacific Ocean waters near Hawaii). While conditioning and evaluating the pH sensor, only expose it filtered, sterilized natural seawater. Do not use seawater CRMs (Certified Reference Material), synthetic seawater, deionized water, NaCl Solutions, or tap water.

Before pre-deployment testing, you will need to fill the plumbing around the pH sensor with natural seawater. The pH sensor needs time to acclimate to the ionic concentration of region specific waters. Once wet, the time to recondition the sensor so that it will report within its accuracy specification depends on several factors, including the ionic composition of the seawater used and the amount of time the pH sensor was stored dry. This time can range from several hours to up to three days.

When the seawater bridge between Counter Electrode and ISFET is broken for longer than 10 seconds, it will be necessary to re-condition the sensor. The sensor does not require recalibration after being re-conditioned.

To prepare the sensor for deployment, it is recommended that several days prior to deployment, the isolated battery is connected via the float interface and the pH sensor is stored in water that is similar to the deployment site. The sensor should be stored dry to avoid bio-fouling of the ISFET and the battery may be removed during storage. Seawater creates a half cell bridge between the Counter Electrode and ISFET, and power to that circuit is provided by the isolated 9V cell. Without seawater, the battery is unnecessary and may be disconnected.

The SeaFET and SeapHOx systems are designed to sample at a fixed depth. If you want to run discreet samples at depth intervals, you will need to find a way to move the system to a specific depth before each sample interval and stop the descent / ascent for the entire pumping and sampling cycle to get a valid CTD / pH / Oxygen sample.

If you are able to communicate with the system through the serial I/O during profiling, you can send a sampling command to the sensor at each depth point and allow it to complete its sample cycle. Consult the manual for each model for the length of time required to complete each sample. Once the sensor provides a sample, you can then move it to the next depth point and repeat.

If you aren’t running real-time communications to the SeaFET/SeapHOx, you could also set it to autonomously sample at a time interval that gives you enough time to move the package to a new depth point between sample cycles. The challenges with this approach would be to know exactly when the sensor is sampling without any direct feedback from the instrument.

The nominal control voltage for the relay is 12 VDC.  However, between 5 – 30 VDC will work, applied to pin 4 relative to the ground pin 2 on the Deep SUNA V2. The voltage can be applied to the relay any time after external power is applied to the instrument for a recommended 100 milliseconds. Unless the relay is already switched on, there should be a very quiet (but audible) click when the relay connects power to the SUNA V2 electronics, and the instrument should enter its boot up cycle.

The purpose of the relay is to keep external power applied to the SUNA with very low quiescent current draw, so the typical use case involves the SUNA constantly powered. If the application includes the ability to switch power to the SUNA effectively then the relay feature isn’t necessary. Regardless of how power cycling to the SUNA is controlled, there should be a power-off period of at least 30 seconds between power-on cycles to ensure that the capacitors that prevent a hard shutdown are allowed to completely discharge and allow the SUNA to boot up properly during the next power-on cycle.

Service

The pH sensor will be shipped dry but was pre-conditioned in seawater (generally from Pacific Ocean waters near Hawaii). While conditioning and evaluating the pH sensor, only expose it filtered, sterilized natural seawater. Do not use seawater CRMs (Certified Reference Material), synthetic seawater, deionized water, NaCl Solutions, or tap water.

Before pre-deployment testing, you will need to fill the plumbing around the pH sensor with natural seawater. The pH sensor needs time to acclimate to the ionic concentration of region specific waters. Once wet, the time to recondition the sensor so that it will report within its accuracy specification depends on several factors, including the ionic composition of the seawater used and the amount of time the pH sensor was stored dry. This time can range from several hours to up to three days.

When the seawater bridge between Counter Electrode and ISFET is broken for longer than 10 seconds, it will be necessary to re-condition the sensor. The sensor does not require recalibration after being re-conditioned.

To prepare the sensor for deployment, it is recommended that several days prior to deployment, the isolated battery is connected via the float interface and the pH sensor is stored in water that is similar to the deployment site. The sensor should be stored dry to avoid bio-fouling of the ISFET and the battery may be removed during storage. Seawater creates a half cell bridge between the Counter Electrode and ISFET, and power to that circuit is provided by the isolated 9V cell. Without seawater, the battery is unnecessary and may be disconnected.

Field Procedures & Deployment

The pH sensor will be shipped dry but was pre-conditioned in seawater (generally from Pacific Ocean waters near Hawaii). While conditioning and evaluating the pH sensor, only expose it filtered, sterilized natural seawater. Do not use seawater CRMs (Certified Reference Material), synthetic seawater, deionized water, NaCl Solutions, or tap water.

Before pre-deployment testing, you will need to fill the plumbing around the pH sensor with natural seawater. The pH sensor needs time to acclimate to the ionic concentration of region specific waters. Once wet, the time to recondition the sensor so that it will report within its accuracy specification depends on several factors, including the ionic composition of the seawater used and the amount of time the pH sensor was stored dry. This time can range from several hours to up to three days.

When the seawater bridge between Counter Electrode and ISFET is broken for longer than 10 seconds, it will be necessary to re-condition the sensor. The sensor does not require recalibration after being re-conditioned.

To prepare the sensor for deployment, it is recommended that several days prior to deployment, the isolated battery is connected via the float interface and the pH sensor is stored in water that is similar to the deployment site. The sensor should be stored dry to avoid bio-fouling of the ISFET and the battery may be removed during storage. Seawater creates a half cell bridge between the Counter Electrode and ISFET, and power to that circuit is provided by the isolated 9V cell. Without seawater, the battery is unnecessary and may be disconnected.

The SeaFET and SeapHOx systems are designed to sample at a fixed depth. If you want to run discreet samples at depth intervals, you will need to find a way to move the system to a specific depth before each sample interval and stop the descent / ascent for the entire pumping and sampling cycle to get a valid CTD / pH / Oxygen sample.

If you are able to communicate with the system through the serial I/O during profiling, you can send a sampling command to the sensor at each depth point and allow it to complete its sample cycle. Consult the manual for each model for the length of time required to complete each sample. Once the sensor provides a sample, you can then move it to the next depth point and repeat.

If you aren’t running real-time communications to the SeaFET/SeapHOx, you could also set it to autonomously sample at a time interval that gives you enough time to move the package to a new depth point between sample cycles. The challenges with this approach would be to know exactly when the sensor is sampling without any direct feedback from the instrument.

The nominal control voltage for the relay is 12 VDC.  However, between 5 – 30 VDC will work, applied to pin 4 relative to the ground pin 2 on the Deep SUNA V2. The voltage can be applied to the relay any time after external power is applied to the instrument for a recommended 100 milliseconds. Unless the relay is already switched on, there should be a very quiet (but audible) click when the relay connects power to the SUNA V2 electronics, and the instrument should enter its boot up cycle.

The purpose of the relay is to keep external power applied to the SUNA with very low quiescent current draw, so the typical use case involves the SUNA constantly powered. If the application includes the ability to switch power to the SUNA effectively then the relay feature isn’t necessary. Regardless of how power cycling to the SUNA is controlled, there should be a power-off period of at least 30 seconds between power-on cycles to ensure that the capacitors that prevent a hard shutdown are allowed to completely discharge and allow the SUNA to boot up properly during the next power-on cycle.

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